AUDREY HEPBURN: A LIFE IN PICTURES

To begin our 2022 programming year, Cinema Salem revisits four films featuring the mid-century star. From high-society comedy to tense thriller, Hepburn’s performances are like Holly Golightly’s black Givenchy dress: timeless.

Sabrina poster

SABRINA

Sun., Jan. 2, 11:00 am
Buy tickets

Thur., Jan. 6, 7:00 pm
Buy tickets

In Hepburn’s second Hollywood film she stars as the title character, the daughter of a chauffeur to the Larrabees, a family of tycoons. When Sabrina returns from culinary school in Paris, she catches the eye of David Larrabee (William Holden), the family rakehell. David’s older brother Linus (Humphrey Bogart) catches a whiff of the blossoming romance and realizes it spells disaster for his careful cultivation of the Larrabee dynasty (which involves marrying David off to the daughter of a sugar cane baron). So Linus takes the only sensible action: wooing Sabrina away from his brother. In addition to making great use of all Hepburn’s talents as a leading lady, SABRINA also enlists master director Billy Wilder, who mellows his trademark screwball antics (SOME LIKE IT HOT, THE APARTMENT) into an enlightened romantic comedy.

Wait Until Dark

WAIT UNTIL DARK

Sun., Jan. 16, 4:30 pm
Buy tickets

Mon., Jan. 17, 7:00 pm
Buy tickets

Coming at the end of her period of peak activity, where she mostly played comedic and romantic heroines, WAIT UNTIL DARK is a shocking and successful change of pace as Hepburn plays against type in this edge-of-your-seat thriller. As Susy, the blind wife of a photographer who is unwittingly entangled in a drug-smuggling plot, Hepburn faces off against a trio of violent con men led by a supremely menacing Alan Arkin. Through its nail-biting climactic confrontation, limited in scope to a single apartment, WAIT UNTIL DARK channels classic thrillers like REAR WINDOW as well as more modern scares like Mike Flanagan’s HUSH.

Charade

CHARADE

Sat., Jan. 22, 7:00 pm
Buy tickets

Sun., Jan. 23, 4:00 pm
Buy tickets

Hepburn stars opposite a dapper-as-ever Cary Grant in this globe-trotting mystery about an unsuspecting simultaneous interpreter who gets wrapped up in her husband’s shady wartime past. The film’s central thrillerish premise (in which Hepburn faces off against three dubious characters who are all after her husband’s ill-gotten gains) is balanced by the lightness of Grant and Hepburn’s will-they won’t-they romance and fueled by a deliciously twisty plot. Directed by musical powerhouse Stanley Donen (SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN, ON THE TOWN), CHARADE stays light on its feet while delivering serious thrills.

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S

Sun., Jan. 30, 4:00 pm
Buy tickets

Hepburn’s iconic turn as Holly Golightly—far and away the role with which she’s most identified nowadays–is also the part that best encapsulates the contradictions of her stardom: the combination of sex appeal and modesty, innocence and sophistication that defined her public image. As film historian Karina Longworth said, BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S is “a film about a golddigging party girl which somehow convinces the viewer that it’s about a girl-next-door princess.” Given the film’s thematic contortions and some confounding plot elements (including a truly regrettable stereotyped turn by Mickey Rooney as Holly’s Japanese-American neighbor), it’s a surprising candidate for inclusion in the cinematic canon, yet its perennial popularity means it’s always ripe for a revisit.